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Since our first Conference in 2000 and on numerous overseas Farm Tours we have been privileged to meet many special people and it is our hope to share this material with you. This will be a work in progress as we add material

Better Farming Better Business Better Living

Effective Governance creates “the space” to recognise opportunities and to act on them - Colin Armer
Adrian van Bysterveldt’s presentation on the importance of Governance to members of the 2015 Positive Farmers New Zealand Study Tour
Adrian van Bysterveldt was a passionate advocate and leader for pasture -based farm systems and his work helped shape and influence the direction of dairy farming, both in New Zealand and Ireland. Before joining Dairy Holdings Ltd in 2016 as the company’s farm practice advisor, Adrian spent 15 years with Dairy NZ as a consulting officer and later a senior developer working on farm systems and farm governance. He also spent time in Ireland as Dairying Systems and Extension Specialist with Ireland’s agriculture and food research body, Teagasc. (Jan 2009 – Mar 2011) He was involved in the Greenfield dairy program and was a much sought after speaker. The Positive farmers were lucky to have a close relationship with Adrian, he spoke at several Positive Farmers Conferences where he always cast a spell over the audience, his clarity and enthusiasm motivated many to improve their systems. “Adrian had a brilliant way of motivating people of all ages to become great pasture managers. He was performance focused and thrived among those who shared his enthusiasm,” Colin Glass.
Governance in farming businesses Adrian van Bysterveldt Family business that adopt formal governance will gain a greater competitive advantage. Governance is a skill – the sooner that you start to practice it the better you will get. Fundamentally governance is a process of decision making and accountability. Excellent governance empowers management to fully use their skills.
Clarity with a Passion
“Regular attendee’s of previous Positive Farmers Conferences will remember the extraordinary knowledge and the completely infectious enthusiasm of Adrian van Bysterveldt when he was talking about grassland management. They were wonderful sessions, possibly what some people don’t know is that after Adrian went back to NZ in 2010 from Ireland he majored in Governance and became phenomenally good in that area, the best I have ever heard in terms of being able to get farmers to understand what Governance is all about. On the 2015 Positive Farmers NZ Farm Tour we got him on video in Ashburton talking to our group on the importance of Governance. It is your best chance to see and hear Adrian talking about what Governance means for farming businesses and as good as he was in grass Adrian’s extraordinary talents and enthusiasm came through and it’s just marvellous”. Michael Murphy
aDRIAN
Adrian van Bysterveldt’s presentation on the importance of Governance to members of the 2015 Positive Farmers New Zealand Study Tour
Papers and more material on Governance to follow shortly
“These are not marginal changes: they’re whole system changes,” he warned, presenting photos of facilities now common on New Zealand dairy farms: feedpads; large tractors, feeder wagons, forage harvesting gear, barns and silage bunds. “There are some very good farmers using some or all of these things and I’m not saying they’re all bad, but they are all very expensive and because of that you have to use them extremely well if you’re going to make a profit,” he said. And it’s not just machines used to make or deliver extra feed that push up costs. Waste, both at ensilaging and feeding out, is often far higher than anticipated. From 100 tonnes harvested, “if you do it well you might get 90t down the cow’s throat; but if you do it badly you might end up only getting 50t down the cow’s throat, and that has a big effect on the cost [of the feed].” Time required for feeding is also almost always longer than anticipated so labour costs balloon too, he said. “What does baleage really cost? I’ll bet it’s not worth it at the current milk price.” Holmes presented Dairy NZ data from 2000-01 and 2013-14 showing production per hectare and per cow was up 28% and 19% by 2013-14, but operating costs, assets and liabilities were 48%, 63% and 100% greater (see table). At $4.96/kg milksolids (MS), 2000-01 was a high payout year for the time. “Previous years it had been under $4/kg MS.”
“It doesn’t mean you stop spending any money. That would be ridiculous, but you spend money to make a profit and the bottom line is crucial.” (Farmers Weekly)
You spend money to make a profit and the bottom line is crucial
Holmes spelled out how increased supplementary feeding to boost production has hiked both operating and capital costs on most farms over the past decade, usually far more than expected.
Professor Colin Holmes was a Massey University lecturer, researcher, mentor and advocate of the dairy industry. Renowned for his research and advocacy of the dairy industry, Holmes will not only be remembered for his long and distinguished career in the industry, but also as a gentlemanly, caring person. Colin was born in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in December 1941 where his Northern Irish father was in the Colonial Civil Service. In 1951, the family moved back to County Antrim where they lived on a small farm, running pigs, sheep, and beef cattle. After school in Enniskillen and a Bachelor of Agriculture degree at Queens University, Belfast, he completed his PhD in 1966 at Brabaham Institute near Cambridge, England, and accepted a lecturing position in the Department of Dairy Husbandry at Massey University. He spent 40 years teaching diploma and degree courses and postgraduate students. He is widely regarded throughout the dairy industry both nationally and internationally.
  
Positive Farmers, Cork, Ireland Open; Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm Telephone; 353 87 6457987 Email: positivefarmers@gmail.com
Adrian talking on the importance of Governance to members of the 2015 Positive Farmers New Zealand Study Tour
HOME

Resource Library

Since our first Conference in 2000 and on numerous overseas Farm Tours we have been privileged to meet many special people and it is our hope to share this material with you. This will be a work in progress as we add material
Effective Governance creates “the space” to recognise opportunities and to act on them - Colin Armer
Adrian van Bysterveldt’s presentation on the importance of Governance to members of the 2015 Positive Farmers New Zealand Study Tour
Adrian van Bysterveldt was a passionate advocate and leader for pasture -based farm systems and his work helped shape and influence the direction of dairy farming, both in New Zealand and Ireland. Before joining Dairy Holdings Ltd in 2016 as the company’s farm practice advisor, Adrian spent 15 years with DairyNZ as a consulting officer and later a senior developer working on farm systems and farm governance. He also spent time in Ireland as Dairying Systems and
Clarity with a Passion
Extension Specialist with Ireland’s agriculture and food research body, Teagasc. (Jan 2009 – Mar 2011) He was involved in the Greenfield dairy program and was a much sought after speaker. The Positive farmers were lucky to have a close relationship with Adrian, he spoke at several Positive Farmers Conferences where he always cast a spell over the audience, his clarity and enthusiasm motivated many to improve their systems. “Adrian had a brilliant way of motivating people of all ages to become great pasture managers. He was performance focused and thrived among those who shared his enthusiasm,” Colin Glass.
“Regular attendee’s of previous Positive Farmers Conferences will remember the extraordinary knowledge and the completely infectious enthusiasm of Adrian van Bysterveldt when he was talking about grassland management. They were wonderful sessions, possibly what some people don’t know is that after Adrian went back to NZ in 2010 from Ireland he majored in Governance and became phenomenally good in that area, the best I have ever heard in terms of being able to get farmers to understand what Governance is all about. The Positive Farmers got him on video in 2015 in Ashburton NZ. It is your best chance to see and hear Adrian talking about what Governance means for farming businesses and as good as he was in grass Adrian’s extraordinary talents and enthusiasm came through and it’s just marvellous”. Michael Murphy
aDRIAN
Papers and more material on Governance to follow shortly
You spend money to make a profit and the bottom line is crucial
“These are not marginal changes: they’re whole system changes,” he warned, presenting photos of facilities now common on New Zealand dairy farms: feed-pads; large tractors, feeder wagons, forage harvesting gear, barns and silage bunds. “There are some very good farmers using some or all of these things and I’m not saying they’re all bad, but they are all very expensive and because of that you have to use them extremely well if you’re going to make a profit,” he said. And it’s not just machines used to make or deliver extra feed that push up costs. Waste, both at ensilaging and feeding out, is often far higher than anticipated. From 100 tonnes harvested, “if you do it well you might get 90t down the cow’s throat; but if you do it badly you might end up only getting 50t down the cow’s throat, and that has a big effect on the cost [of the feed].” Time required for feeding is also almost always longer than anticipated so labour costs balloon too, he said. “What does baleage really cost? I’ll bet it’s not worth it at the current milk price.” Holmes presented Dairy NZ data from 2000-01 and 2013-14 showing production per hectare and per cow was up 28% and 19% by 2013-14, but operating costs, assets and liabilities were 48%, 63% and 100% greater (see table). At $4.96/kg milksolids (MS), 2000-01 was a high payout year for the time. “Previous years it had been under $4/kg MS.”
“It doesn’t mean you stop spending any money. That would be ridiculous, but you spend money to make a profit and the bottom line is crucial.”
Holmes spelled out how increased supplementary feeding to boost production has hiked both operating and capital costs on most farms over the past decade, usually far more than expected.
Professor Colin Holmes was a Massey University lecturer, researcher, mentor and advocate of the dairy industry. Renowned for his research and advocacy of the dairy industry, Holmes will not only be remembered for his long and distinguished career in the industry, but also as a gentlemanly, caring person. Colin was born in Colombo, Sri Lanka, in December 1941 where his Northern Irish father was in the Colonial Civil Service. In 1951, the family moved back to County Antrim where they lived on a small farm, running pigs, sheep, and beef cattle. After school in Enniskillen and a Bachelor of Agriculture degree at Queens University, Belfast, he completed his PhD in 1966 at Brabaham Institute near Cambridge, England, and accepted a lecturing position in the Department of Dairy Husbandry at Massey University. He spent 40 years teaching diploma and degree courses and postgraduate students. He is widely regarded throughout the dairy industry both nationally and internationally.

Better Farming Better Business Better Living

  
353 87 6457987
Open; Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm
Adrian van Bysterveldt talking on the importance of Governance to members of the 2015 Positive Farmers New Zealand Study Tour
Governance in farming businesses Adrian van Bysterveldt Family business that adopt formal governance will gain a greater competitive advantage Governance is a skill – the sooner that you start to practice it the better you will get. Fundamentally governance is a process of decision making and accountability. Excellent governance empowers management to fully use their skills.